World Cup 2022: Why Qatar Protests Are Justified – and Hypocritical

After the Olympic Games in China and the World Cup in Russia, the world has suddenly begun to show interest in corruption and human rights violations in Qatar

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Uzi Dann
Uzi Dann
Doha
Uzi Dann
Uzi Dann
Doha

For years, there has not been a single World Cup in which the host has not been guilty of corruption at some level, including bribes to those who choose the location. The list includes Germany in 2006, South Africa in 2010 and Russia in 2018; in the case of Brazil in 2014, there simply weren’t any other competing bids. Nevertheless, the way that Qatar was selected to host this year’s World Cup was particularly corrupt and jarring, and would anger any decent person.
The combination of blatant corruption and certain characteristics of Qatar – a country lacking any sports history or frequent games, with a dictatorial regime that has a dismal résumé when it comes to human rights and support for terrorism – was too much, and was only the start.

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