Canadian-Israeli Teen Killed in Jerusalem Bombing Was a ‘Charming and Gentle’ Boy

Rabbi Aharon Kahana of the Harei Yehuda Yeshiva where 15-year-old Aryeh Shechopek was a student, called the teen a 'genius' who was beloved by all

Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol
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Aryeh Shechopek
Aryeh Shechopek
Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol

A large crowd gathers in Jerusalem to attend the funeral of the 15-year-old Israeli-Canadian student killed in Wednesday morning’s double bombing in Jerusalem.

The head of the yeshiva attended by him described his former student as a “charming boy” who was “gentle and tender” and beloved by all.

Speaking with Haaretz following the attack, Rabbi Aharon Kahana of the Harei Yehuda Yeshiva in Beit Meir mourned the loss of Aryeh Shechopek, a resident of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Har Nof, calling him a “genius” who sought to advance in his studies “and was very pleasant to his friends, to whom he was beloved.”

“It’s very hard on his friends,” he said.

The funeral of 15-year-old Aryeh Shechopek.Credit: Ohad Zwigenberg

“I just want to say goodbye to my son Aryeh,” the victim’s father, Moshe, said at the funeral. “I want to apologize to him. God giveth and God taketh away. He was a child who taught us a lesson.”

Rabbi Naftali Schreiver from the Harei Yehuda Yeshiva, revealed that Aryeh “did not feel well this morning and contemplated staying at home. He was advised to stay at home, but he decided to push through and come to the yeshiva. Nobody can say that they every saw anger in this boy, he didn't know what anger was.”

Speaking with the ultra-Orthodox news site Kikar Hashabbat, Rabbi Shlomo Ginzburg, another of Shechopek’s rabbis, said that the young man was “brilliant” and “a very nice guy with a smile.”

“Everyone loved him. Everyone wanted to be in his company,” he said.

According to Behadrei Haredim, another ultra-Orthodox news site, Shechopek was on his way to yeshiva when he was killed – even though he had been feeling unwell and his mother had urged him to remain home.

Twenty-two people were wounded in the double terror attack on Wednesday, including one in critical condition and two in serious condition, when two explosive devices were remotely detonated at a crowded bus stop in Jerusalem. No group has taken responsibility for the deadly attack.

The scene of the terror attack in Jerusalem, on Wednesday.Credit: Ohad Zwigenberg

A senior security official told Haaretz that the character of the twin attacks indicates that there is significant infrastructure behind them, including intelligence, the obtainment and preparation of explosives – while a police source stated that the devices were likely controlled remotely and contained nails. Both of the devices were place inside bags.

Sigal Bar Zvi, head of the police operations division, said that the explosive charges were very powerful and of “high quality.”

“We are witnessing a series of terror attacks, mostly in Judea and Samaria [the West Bank] and today in Jerusalem. It is clear that there is an intention to harm the public resilience and morale,” he said.

The attack was condemned as “abhorrent” by the Canadian Embassy while the United States embassy in Jerusalem said that it condemned the attacks in the “strongest possible terms” and is currently “closely monitoring the situation.”

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