Left for Dead: The Rise and Demise of Israel's Ultimate Left-wing Party

From Shulamit Aloni’s big mouth to Yossi Sarid’s resignation, from the first gay MK to the internal debate on the Zionist question: several of the more significant stops along the 30 years road of Meretz, which in last week's election failed to enter Israel’s parliament

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Ofer Aderet
Ofer Aderet
Ofer Aderet
Ofer Aderet

On June 24, 1992, the front page of Haaretz informed readers of “an apparent political upheaval.” In the election held the previous day, the Labor Party headed by Yitzhak Rabin won 44 seats in Knesset, and Likud, headed by Yitzhak Shamir, received only 32. In third, with 12 seats, was a new party known as Meretz, which was composed of three separate political factions that had merged prior to the election: Ratz, headed by Shulamit Aloni; Mapam, headed by Yair Tzaban; and Shinui, headed by Amnon Rubinstein.

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