Netanyahu Wrote a Victorious Autobiography but Couldn't Resist His Own Victimhood

‘Bibi: My Story’ sees Benjamin Netanyahu casting himself and his family as the key players in Israel’s history, relegating everyone else – Ben-Gurion, Rabin, Peres – to the margins. Almost inadvertently, it tells us a lot about the country’s longest-serving prime minister

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Anshel Pfeffer
Anshel Pfeffer
Anshel Pfeffer
Anshel Pfeffer

Benjamin Netanyahu’s first visit to the house on the corner of Balfour Street in Jerusalem that decades later would be so identified with his long rule over Israel was 22 years before he became its official occupant. The 24-year-old arrived there on a summer evening in 1974 – along with his father, the historian Benzion Netanyahu – for a private meeting with then-Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. It had been arranged by Rabin’s daughter, Dalia, who knew Bibi from her military service at the headquarters of Sayeret Matkal (the Israeli army’s elite special forces unit, where all three of the Netanyahu brothers had served).

Comments